Tag Archives: Martin Luther King

Obama’s Pathetic MLK speech

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The Presidents Speech

Sad to say but not surprising this President missed an opportunity to bring us together and instead chose to come out to the left of

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream

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Mr. President, its not about

‘Class Warfare’

Its about…

‘We the People’

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Perhaps President Obama’s 20 years sitting in Reverend Wright’s Church has in fact affected his judgement?

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Mr. President, you followed the wrong Preacher

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ANY QUESTIONS?

nobama21

Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream was not about the Barack Obama Nightmare

king_flag

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream was coming true in America. People of all Race’s, Ethnic Backgrounds and Religious Belief’s were all coming together and accomplishing great things to further Harmony amongst us.

Then came the…..

Nightmare logo

The Great Divider

During a Campaign Speech Candidate  Obama began his Divisive Rhetoric and continues on with it to this day.  The violence and Anger we have seen in America these past Four Years are a direct result of this man’s Agenda of Dividing and Conquering America

Obama Flashback:

If They Bring a Knife to the Fight,

We Bring a Gun…

Mobster wisdom tells us never to bring a knife to a gun fight. But what does political wisdom say about bringing a gun to a knife fight?

That’s exactly what Barack Obama said he would do to counter Republican attacks “If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun,” Obama said at a Philadelphia fundraiser.

“Because from what I understand folks in Philly like a good brawl. I’ve seen Eagles fans.”

Read more: http://nation.foxnews.com/politics/2011/01/10/obama-flashback-if-they-bring-knife-fight-we-bring-gun#ixzz1BJv8Vep9

nobama21

Sadly President Obama has taken us back Full Circle to the days of  Racism.  Where will it all end?

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Related articles

Abrab Spring Comes to the Obama White House OWS Style

Is Obama about to have his own Egyptian Moment?

Obama: The Egyptian People Have ‘Inspired’ America

Quoting Martin Luther King, Jr., Obama remarked that “there something in the soul that cries out for freedom,” and praised Egyptians for inspiring Americans, having “bent the arc of history” and putting “lie to the idea that justice must be gained through violence.“ In reflecting on images of parents carrying their children on their shoulders to show them what ”freedom” looks like, the American president echoed protesters’ chants in Arabic, translated as “we are peaceful.”

Speaking from the Grand Foyer of the White House, Obama‘s remarks did little to reassure America’s allies in the region and avoided speculating what the future of the Egyptian government might look like.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/watch-live-obama-says-mubarak-resignation-is-beginning-of-transition/

America Inspired?

Likewise,  Mr. President you have also Inspired many Americans in the same way.  You haven’t paid much attention to our Rally’s at the National Mall,  nor the Town Hall Meetings all across this Great Land.  In fact,  it seems the Elections of November 2010 are nothing more than a distant memory for you.  Already you are back at that old game of back door appointments and deals being done while we sleep.

Were watching you now. 

We aren’t fooled by your smoke & Mirror Tricks of pretending to move to the center. We know your a leftist Smuck and nothing is going to change that except your defeat in November.

We know you now,  Mr. President

We know you’re a Socialist, Progressive, Marxist, and were not going to let it slide.

Occupy Protesters Suspected of Throwing Smoke Bomb over White House FenceOccupy Congress

  • AP

    January 17, 2012: As Congress returns from its winter recess, protesters aligned with the Occupy Wall Street movement demonstrate on Capitol Hill in Washington to decry the influence of corporate money in politics.

WASHINGTON –  An apparent smoke bomb was thrown over the fence of the White House as hundreds of Occupy protesters massed outside the gates.

The crowds were dispersed Tuesday night and the White House was all clear. U.S. Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie says there were no arrests in the incident.

The Obamas were at dinner celebrating Michelle Obama‘s birthday, but they have since returned to the White House without difficulty.

The tense scene outside the White House follows an earlier protest on the West Lawn of the Capitol, in which several hundred protesters affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement decried the influence of corporate money in politics and voice myriad other grievances.Organizers had touted the rally, known as Occupy Congress, as the largest national gathering of Occupy protesters to date and secured a permit that would have allowed up to 10,000 people to participate. By mid-afternoon, the protest appeared to have fallen far short of those goals.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Can You Just Imagine The Outrage Had The Tea Party Protestors Done Something Like That?

 

 

WHERE IS THE MAIN STREAM MEDIA ON REPORTING THIS?

Paying Tribute To A Great African American Freedom Fighter: Dr. Martin Luther King

Martin Luther King, Jr.

On that Celebrated Day in August of 1963 America began to take seriously the need to move forward on Civil Rights for people of all Races, Ethnic Backgrounds and Religious Beliefs. Great have been the strides that We the People have made in Equality for all Americans.

I present to you that Historic Speech:

Martin Luther King Jr. Speech

August 28th 1963

I have a Dream Today

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves, who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.

One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s Capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism.

Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy.

Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice.

Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all God’s children.

Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual.

There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrong deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities.

We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one.

We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote, and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote.

No, no we are not satisfied and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by storms of persecutions and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our modern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream.

It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day out on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state sweltering with the heat and injustice of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plains and the crooked places will be made straight and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.

With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.

With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s Children will be able to sing with new meaning “My country tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride, from every Mountainside, Let Freedom Ring!”

And if America is to be a Great Nation, this must Become True.

So let Freedom Ring from the Prodigious Hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let Freedom Ring from the Mighty Mountains of New York.

Let Freedom Ring from the Heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let Freedom Ring from the Snow-Capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let Freedom Ring from the Curvaceous Peaks of California.

But not only that, let Freedom, Ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let Freedom Ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let Freedom Ring from every Hill and Molehill of Mississippi. From every Mountainside, let Freedom Ring.

When we let Freedom Ring, when we let it ring from every Village and every Hamlet, from every State and every City, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s Children, Black Men and White Men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro Spiritual, “Free at Last, Free at Last.

Thank God Almighty,

We are Free at Last.”

Martin Luther King, 1964

Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream was not about the Barack Obama Nightmare

On that Celebrated Day in August of 1963 America began to take seriously the need to move forward on Civil Rights for people of all Races, Ethnic Backgrounds and Religious Beliefs. Great have been the strides that We the People have made in Equality for all Americans.

I present to you that Historic Speech:

Martin Luther King Jr. Speech

August 28th 1963

I have a Dream Today

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves, who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.

One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s Capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism.

Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy.

Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice.

Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all God’s children.

Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual.

There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrong deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities.

We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one.

We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote, and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote.

No, no we are not satisfied and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by storms of persecutions and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our modern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream.

It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day out on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state sweltering with the heat and injustice of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plains and the crooked places will be made straight and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.

With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.

With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s Children will be able to sing with new meaning “My country tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride, from every Mountainside, Let Freedom Ring!”

And if America is to be a Great Nation, this must Become True.

So let Freedom Ring from the Prodigious Hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let Freedom Ring from the Mighty Mountains of New York.

Let Freedom Ring from the Heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let Freedom Ring from the Snow-Capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let Freedom Ring from the Curvaceous Peaks of California.

But not only that, let Freedom, Ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let Freedom Ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let Freedom Ring from every Hill and Molehill of Mississippi. From every Mountainside, let Freedom Ring.

When we let Freedom Ring, when we let it ring from every Village and every Hamlet, from every State and every City, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s Children, Black Men and White Men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro Spiritual, “Free at Last, Free at Last.

Thank God Almighty, we are Free at Last.”

 Reverend Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream was coming true in America. People of all Race’s, Ethnic Backgrounds and Religious Belief’s were all coming together and accomplishing great things to further Harmony amongst us.

Then came the…..

Nightmare logo

The Great Divider

During a Campaign Speech Candidate  Obama began his Divisive Rhetoric and continues on with it to this day.  The violence and Anger we have seen in America these past Three years are a direct result of this man’s Agenda of Dividing and Conquering America

Obama Flashback: ‘If They Bring a Knife to the Fight, We Bring a Gun

Mobster wisdom tells us never to bring a knife to a gun fight. But what does political wisdom say about bringing a gun to a knife fight?

That’s exactly what Barack Obama said he would do to counter Republican attacks “If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun,” Obama said at a Philadelphia fundraiser.

“Because from what I understand folks in Philly like a good brawl. I’ve seen Eagles fans.”

Read more: http://nation.foxnews.com/politics/2011/01/10/obama-flashback-if-they-bring-knife-fight-we-bring-gun#ixzz1BJv8Vep9

ANY QUESTIONS?

The Injustice of Social Justice

Welcome to the Liberal Mind


The 2011 Liberal Poster Child

Are they really Winning ?

Why Yes, YES THEY ARE !

Voting American Articles

American Pride vs Union Pride….Wisconsin

American Pride

Glenn Beck Rally Washington DC 8/28/2010

Union Pride

The Pictures and Video tell the Story

ANY QUESTIONS?

Featured comment on this post shared by:

Good morning Samiam, I’ll try this again. Somehow I lost my comment.

Marveous post. It is amazing to see the difference between left and right isn’t it?

On the right, there is peace, love of country, love of God, love of family, love of liberty, tolerance and freedom.

On the left, the oh so hating left, there is hate, vitriol, corruption, intolerance, incivility, greed, thuggery and the urge to suppress.

It is like night and day.

Please be sure and visit her post at: bydesign001